Invisible

I posted this on Facebook last year, but the message of acknowledging and supporting sub-groups is an important one. I’m discussing this at church with respect to how we interact with fellow Christians from other denominations. The science fiction and gaming communities are in a constant struggle with respect to who is considered a fan. On the eve of the LA Marathon it is important to remember that runners come in all shapes and sizes (and speeds). When looking at humanity in general, erasure of sub-groups is a good way of describing much of the injustice in the world.


Sharing [the wikipedia article on Bisexual Erasure] on the Anniversary of marrying an LGBT woman. I am a cisgendered heterosexual male.

My situation would on the surface seem to be one more argument on the side of “bi-sexuals don’t exist.” The woman I married on Feb. 13th thought she was bi-sexual. It took quite a lot of struggle to figure out that she was actually a Lesbian. My heart was shattered that the love of my life wouldn’t be sharing that love for the rest of my life, but if she can struggle through all of that and find happiness anyone can – even me.

When the majority denies that a minority category exists (or isn’t important or shouldn’t exist or is wrong for one reason or another) it shuts down discussion.  It makes it almost impossible for someone who is part of that minority (or thinks they might be) to figure out who they are. Figuring out who you are is hard. This makes WAY harder than it should be.

For me, bisexual erasure means that someone I care about suffered much longer than she should have. It means that part of what made my marriage unique and beautiful was invisible. Half of my better half was invisible.


This seems like a perfect place to point out the 2 volumes edited by Jim C. Hines: Invisible: Personal Essays on Representation in SF/F and Invisible 2: Personal Essays on Representation in SF/F.

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~ by mentatjack on February 13, 2016.

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